Saturday, June 28, 2008

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Thursday, June 26, 2008

TNF 100 registration is now open!

TNF 100 registration is now open!Jun 26, '08 2:02 AM
for everyone

The North Face 100 registration is now open! While we are still waiting for the online registration to be ready you can now download the forms at this site and submit your registration at TNF and ROX stores. Attached is some basic information about the event.

The start and finish will be held in Chateau Royale located at the boundary of the Tagaytay and Nasugbu.

You can also email your inquiries to TNF100@gmail.com or SMS and call the hotline: 09202855285.

Registration at Bratpack and ResToeRun store nationwide will be accpeted end next week, please standby for more detail.

For bloggers and running club, you are free to post the forms at your website as well for your members and readers download. Thanks!
Attachment: TNF100_Info.pdf
Attachment: TNF100_regform.pdf
Attachment: TNF 100 50km Loop_72dpi.jpg

Tuesday, June 24, 2008

Sad, Sad, Tragic Day for AMCI and fellow mountaineers.

Members of my AMCI family were on a recon climb in Zambales when storm Frank hit. 3 of the climbing group's members and 1 guide were washed away by a flooded and raging creek. Bojo Torres, was found alive yesterday and is in the hospital. Jhoana Pimentel's (2k6) body was found on sunday. Thads (2k5) my batchmate is still missing. I'm still hoping for the best. Please include them in your prayers.

Here's a news article written about the incident, which i got from TonyBoy's site.

2 mountaineers drown, 1 missing, 9 rescued
By: Mamer BaƱez

SAN Antonio, Zambales -- Two mountaineers drowned while another
was missing when they were swept by flashfloods while crossing a
creek at the foot of Mount Pundakit at the height of
typhoon "Frank."

Nine of their companions were rescued by the police, Navy and
barangay officials of Pundakit. Police chief Insp. Modesto Dadural,
Jr. identified the fatalities as Joseph Felarca of Project 8, Quezon
City, and Joan Pimentel. Missing was Thaddeus Reantaso. They are all
members of the AMCI Mountaineering Club, Inc. based in Makati City.

Rescuers recovered the bodies of Felarca and Pimentel floating off
the coast of Barangay Pundakit.

Rescued were Robert Joseph Torres, Kimberly San Juan, Teejay Sakuma,
Suzzeth Santiago, Joseph Paulve, Marris Zapanta, Virgilio Zapanta
Lean Vellongco and Broji Forcadela, all from Metro Manila.

SPO2 Roberto Llorico said the group climbed Mount Pundakit Saturday
and went downhill at 12:30 p.m. yesterday when the accident occured.
A large volume of water cascading from the mountain swept the
victims downstream. The survivors were able to hold on to each other
and anchored their feet on the rocks in the middle of the creek.
Torres, who sustained bone fractures, was taken to the San Marcelino
District Hospital.

Rescuers continue their recovery operation for the other missing
mountaineer.

The last time i saw Jho was Friday, June 20 just before they went to Pundaquit, Zambales for the Recon climb. It was Genie's bday and AMCI was there in full force to celebrate. I remember screaming Hitad!!!!! When Jho and Kim arrived. I even danced with Jho when we were already tipsy and enjoying the music. She was even telling me to join TC 1 where she was supposed to be an assistant team leader. Who knew that when i gave her a kiss and hug as we said goodbye, that it was the last time i'll see her alive.

Jho described herself as a Mountaholic, because she really loved mountain climbing and nature. She was an outdoorsy girl, always challenging herself and pushing herself to the limit. There was no mountain she can't conquer with her positive attitude and a sense of humor. She was also one of the Raspakids' drinking buddies. And when we would get get drunk and silly up in the boondocks, there was no dull moment. Laugh-Out-Loud happiness everytime Jhoanna was with us in a climb. Tag team sila ni Kim --and i fondly refer to them as the Hitads. Jhoanna was also very compassionate, try searching for Jhoanna Pimentel in Google and you'll find an article about her organizing a book drive for public schools in the mountains.

She really loved the outdoors and nature, and she would join a climb every chance she got. It's just so ironic that nature would be the one to cause her untimely death. She will be missed tremendously. She was truly a wonderful person. And her Multiply signature bets captures how she lived her life- -"Live, Love , Laugh."

Whereever you are sweetie, keep us your fellow moutaineers safe in the mountains. I know that once a mountaholic, will always be a mountaholic even in the after-life. See you when i do. Dapat may welcome drink ako ok? Rest well my mountaineer friend. This is how i'll remember you. :-)

P.S. Thad is still missing, but i fervently wish that he be found alive.

My 2k5 batchmates and other AMCI members have volunteered to help in the search and rescue of Thads and are en route to Zambales. I was supposed to join them, but when i asked permission from my Mom she went ballistic. Now i feel so guilty and helpless for not being able to actively look for Thads along with Janz, Joven, Ryan, Mercy and some other AMCI batchmates. I really wish we find him soon. It's his birthday tomorrow and that would be the perfect birthday gift.



by: http://solitaire6.multiply.com/journal/item/76

Thursday, June 5, 2008

Mayan Apocalypse, 2012

philwebsupport.com


!

Did the Mayans REALLY predict a doomsday event?
Apparently, the world is going to end on December 21st, 2012. Yes, you read correctly, in some way, shape or form, the Earth (or at least a large portion of humans on the planet) will cease to exist. Stop planning your careers, don't bother buying a house, and be sure to spend the last years of your life doing something you always wanted to do but never had the time. Now you have the time, four years of time, to enjoy yourselves before… the end.

So what is all this crazy talk? We've all heard these doomsday predictions before, we're still here, and the planet is still here, why is 2012 so important? Well, the Mayan calendar stops at the end of the year 2012, churning up all sorts of religious, scientific, astrological and historic reasons why this calendar foretells the end of life as we know it. The Mayan Prophecy is gaining strength and appears to be worrying people in all areas of society. Forget Nostradamus, forget the Y2K bug, forget the credit crunch, this event is predicted to be huge and many wholeheartedly believe this is going to happen for real. Planet X could even be making a comeback.

2012 related articles:

For all those 2012 Mayan Prophecy believers out there, I have bad news. There is going to be no doomsday event in 2012, and here's why…

The extent of the Mayan empire

The Mayan Calendar
So what is the Mayan Calendar? The calendar was constructed by an advanced civilization called the Mayans around 250-900 AD. Evidence for the Maya empire stretches around most parts of the southern states of Mexico and reaches down to the current geological locations of Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador and some of Honduras. The people living in Mayan society exhibited very advanced written skills and had an amazing ability when constructing cities and urban planning. The Mayans are probably most famous for their pyramids and other intricate and grand buildings. The people of Maya had a huge impact on Central American culture, not just within their civilization, but with other indigenous populations in the region. Significant numbers of Mayans still live today, continuing their age-old traditions.

The Mayans used many different calendars and viewed time as a meshing of spiritual cycles. While the calendars had practical uses, such as social, agricultural, commercial and administrative tasks, there was a very heavy religious element. Each day had a patron spirit, signifying that each day had specific use. This contrasts greatly with our modern Gregorian calendar which primarily sets the administrative, social and economic dates.

Venus Express observation of Venus (ESA)

Most of the Mayan calendars were short. The Tzolk'in calendar lasted for 260 days and the Haab' approximated the solar year of 365 days. The Mayans then combined both the Tzolk'in and the Haab' to form the "Calendar Round", a cycle lasting 52 Haab's (around 52 years, or the approximate length of a generation). Within the Calendar Round were the trecena (13 day cycle) and the veintena (20 day cycle). Obviously, this system would only be of use when considering the 18,980 unique days over the course of 52 years. In addition to these systems, the Mayans also had the "Venus Cycle". Being keen and highly accurate astronomers they formed a calendar based on the location of Venus in the night sky. It's also possible they did the same with the other planets in the Solar System.

Using the Calendar Round is great if you simply wanted to remember the date of your birthday or significant religious periods, but what about recording history? There was no way to record a date older than 52 years.

The end of the Long Count = the end of the Earth?
The Mayans had a solution. Using an innovative method, they were able to expand on the 52 year Calendar Round. Up to this point, the Mayan Calendar may have sounded a little archaic - after all, it was possibly based on religious belief, the menstrual cycle, mathematical calculations using the numbers 13 and 20 as the base units and a heavy mix of astrological myth. The only principal correlation with the modern calendar is the Haab' that recognised there were 365 days in one solar year (it's not clear whether the Mayans accounted for leap years). The answer to a longer calendar could be found in the "Long Count", a calendar lasting 5126 years.

I'm personally very impressed with this dating system. For starters, it is numerically predictable and it can accurately pinpoint historical dates. However, it depends on a base unit of 20 (where modern calendars use a base unit of 10). So how does this work?

The base year for the Mayan Long Count starts at "0.0.0.0.0". Each zero goes from 0-19 and each represent a tally of Mayan days. So, for example, the first day in the Long Count is denoted as 0.0.0.0.1. On the 19th day we'll have 0.0.0.0.19, on the 20th day it goes up one level and we'll have 0.0.0.1.0. This count continues until 0.0.1.0.0 (about one year), 0.1.0.0.0 (about 20 years) and 1.0.0.0.0 (about 400 years). Therefore, if I pick an arbitrary date of 2.10.12.7.1, this represents the Mayan date of approximately 1012 years, 7 months and 1 day.

This is all very interesting, but what has this got to do with the end of the world? The Mayan Prophecy is wholly based on the assumption that something bad is going to happen when the Mayan Long Count calendar runs out. Experts are divided as to when the Long Count ends, but as the Maya used the numbers of 13 and 20 at the root of their numerical systems, the last day could occur on 13.0.0.0.0. When does this happen? Well, 13.0.0.0.0 represents 5126 years and the Long Count started on 0.0.0.0.0, which corresponds to the modern date of August 11th 3114 BC. Have you seen the problem yet? The Mayan Long Count ends 5126 years later on December 21st, 2012.

Doomsday
When something ends (even something as innocent as an ancient calendar), people seem to think up the most extreme possibilities for the end of civilization as we know it. A brief scan of the internet will pull up the most popular to some very weird ways that we will, with little logical thought, be wiped off the face of the planet. Archaeologists and mythologists on the other hand believe that the Mayans predicted an age of enlightenment when 13.0.0.0.0 comes around; there isn't actually much evidence to suggest doomsday will strike. If anything, the Mayans predict a religious miracle, not anything sinister.

Myths are abound and seem to be fuelling movie storylines. It looks like the new Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull is even based around the Mayan myth that 13 crystal skulls can save humanity from certain doom. This myth says that if the 13 ancient skulls are not brought together at the right time, the Earth will be knocked off its axis. This might be a great plotline for blockbuster movies, but it also highlights the hype that can be stirred, lighting up religious, scientific and not-so-scientific ideas that the world is doomed.

Could an asteroid wipe out the Earth? (NASA)

Some of the most popular space-based threats to the Earth and mankind focus on Planet X wiping most life off the planet, meteorite impacts, black holes, Gamma Ray Bursts from nearby galaxies, a rapid ice age and a polar (magnetic) shift. There is so much evidence against these things happening in 2012, it's shocking just how much of a following they have generated. Each of the above "threats" needs their own devoted article as to why there is no hard evidence to support the hype.

But the fact remains, the Mayan Doomsday Prophecy is purely based on a calendar which we believe hasn't been designed to calculate dates beyond 2012. Mayan archaeo-astronomers are even in debate as to whether the Long Count is designed to be reset to 0.0.0.0.0 after 13.0.0.0.0, or whether the calendar simply continues to 20.0.0.0.0 (approximately 8000 AD) and then reset.
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